ANNUAL PUBLICATION 2005 

The foreword to the Annual Publication 2005 was written by the Honourable Michael Kirby AC CMG, and is available from his website as item 2061 – Foreword Legal Philosophy Oct 2005.

The 2005 Annual Publication included the ALPSA lecture given by Sir Anthony Mason on 7 September 2005. The lecture was also published (with several footnotes added) in: Anthony Mason, ‘Themes and tensions underlying the law of contract’ in Geoffrey Lindell (ed) The Mason Papers: Selected Articles and Speeches (Federation Press, 2007) 296.

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ANNUAL PUBLICATION 2004: “LAW, MEMORY AND LITERATURE”

law-alpsa

The Annual Publication 2004 was a collaboration with UQ Vanguard. The editorial board included:

  • Pascal Alexander-Bossy
  • Lauren Barker
  • Elliott Bledsoe
  • Adam Cholinski
  • Felicity Clark
  • Katherine Del Mar
  • Sarah Holland-Batt
  • Kathleen Jennings
  • Matyas Kochardy
  • Max Leskiewicz
  • Kate Lilley
  • Jamie Nuttal
  • Ben Pullar
  • Laura Skerlj
  • Mark Smith

Contents

Preface                                                        Hon Justice Ian Callinan

Introduction                                               Max Leskiewicz

Law, Literature, Memory                           Peter Brooks

Concrete Summer, 1987                              Sarah Holland-Batt

Letter                                                            Kieran Dolin

Laws of Memory                                           Katherine Del Mar

“Judges cannot afford the luxury of much contemporary literature, of blending fiction and fact. It is not open for those who live and are bound by the legal system, to say that the truth is different for each person, and that everyone is entitled to his or her own truth. The fact that the ascertainment of the truth is difficult, in some cases impossible, is no reason to abandon the search for it. The same may be said of moral purpose. Not all moral values are incontestable. But the fact that they may differ from culture to culture, and even within a culture, provides insufficient reason to discard them. None of this means that an important aspect of mind, memory, and indeed of morals as well, the imagination, has no role to play in the law. Little could be more important than the need for the judge to imagine how it was, how otherwise it might have been, and how it will be in the future for the people his decision might affect. It is here, in imagination, that there is therefore the great confluence of the law and literature.”

~ the Honourable Justice Ian Callinan, Preface

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